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Russian scientists developed a novel method of collecting blood samples

13 August 2018

GMP News

Russian researchers have developed a non-contact method of taking blood samples. Laser device will provide absolute sterility, minimal pain for a patient, rapid wound healing and high cost-effectiveness compared to automatic lancets with a retractable needle.

The process is absolutely sterile and practically painless. A wound turns out not to be discontinuous,but smooth and free from dermonecrosis. Wound healing is much faster than usual. In the future, such a laser may replace outdated vaccination needles (scarificators). The main goal is to reduce cost of such devices.

“If the researchers manage to make price of one puncture made by a laser device significantly lower, then medical institutions would be ready to purchase such devices”- says Dr. Philip Kopylov, the Director of the Institute for Personalized Medicine of Sechenov University.

First Moscow State Medical University (MSMU, officially I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University), informally Sechenov University is the largest research medical school in Russia. It offers undergraduate and postgraduate courses taught in English and Russian in all areas of medicine, biology and biotechnology, including bachelor’s degrees, specialist degrees, master’s programs, clinical residency programs, PhD programs and CME courses.

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